Tracking
Tiger
Sharks

Tracking tiger sharks using fin mounted satellite tags has helped researcher Matt Smukall better understand how reproduction influences movement in Bimini and the surrounding area. The Bimini Shark Lab has extensively documented large mature female tiger sharks and newborn tiger sharks in the shallow waters of Bimini, however it has been unclear how these sharks are using local ecosystem. This tracking study intends to understand seasonality and repeat migrations to Bimini, with particular emphasis on movements during pupping season. It is now apparent that even after long migrations of up to 5000 miles, tiger sharks are able to navigate back to the tiny island of Bimini to presumably drop their offspring. 

Dani is one of these spectacular sharks who travelled to the far north Atlantic, off the coast of Canada, most likely during mating season. While her satellite detections became intermittent, she was confirmed to have come back to Bimini in the summer of both 2019 and 2020 through use of acoustic telemetry. Dani provides a great track which highlights the ability of these sharks to navigate across open oceans and return home. 

Check out Dani's track on the interactive map!

tigertrack.jpg

Dani

GALEOCERDO CUVIER

TOTAL LENGTH: 334CM


PIT TAG ID #: 989001026313283

SEX: FEMALE

AGE: APPROX. 11 YEARS 

PREGNANT: YES

TAGGING DATE: 26 JUNE 2018

RETURN TO BIMINI: SUMMER 2019 & 2020

DISTANCE TRAVELLED: ~5000 MILES