University Courses

Overview

Throughout the year, the BBFSF hosts a number of Tropical Marine Biology or Shark Biology courses. Specific courses can be tailored to the needs of other colleges and high schools. Below are the details of courses taught at BBFSF, along with the associated University and contact details of the major professor’s that lead each course. 

Shark Biology Course | Eckerd College, St. Petersburg, FL

This 5-7 day shark biology course is a field component for a shark biology course at Eckerd College taught by Professor Dr. William A. Szelistowski. Students spend the vast majority of their time on field trips observing a variety of shark species around Bimini. Lectures, videos and project talks are also given by the staff of the Shark Lab, including lectures by Dr. Samuel Gruber and Dr. Tristan Guttridge. Students participate in field techniques commonly used in the Sharklabs ongoing research such as gillnetting or tracking lemon sharks. Field trips include shark dives, stingray feedings, long lining, vertical deep water long lining, nurse shark feedings and even attempts at snorkelling with hammerheads. 

When

Mid to end March ever year.

Contact

Dr. Samuel Gruber - samuel.gruber@biminisharklab.com

Dr. William Szelistowski - szeliswa@eckerd.edu

From Corals to Sharks: Tropical Marine Biology in the Bahamas | Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL

Students from Florida State University spend seven days at the Sharklab as part of a field intensive two-week course taught by FSU researcher, and longtime Shark Lab alum, Dr. Dean Grubbs. Students receive hands-on introduction to the diversity and biology of sharks and their relatives through observation, handling and, in some cases, swimming with a variety of species. Furthermore, students learn about methods used to study sharks and directly participate in active sharklab research projects ranging from abundance surveys to electronic tracking of individual sharks. Finally, Bimini's proximity to the Gulf Stream, the steep continental slope, and Dr. Grubbs active research on deepwater sharks will provide students with the rare opportunity to observe and study species that have been seen by very few people. 

When

End of June (next 2015)

Contact

Dr. Samuel Gruber - samuel.gruber@biminisharklab.com

Dr. Dean Grubbs - dgrubbs@bio.fsu.edu

Biology and Ecology of Elasmobranchs (Biology 3663) | University of New Brunswick, Saint John, NB

This 7-day Shark Biology Course is a field component for a shark biology course at UNB taught by Professor Dr. Stephen Turnbull. Students are taken on a number of daily field trips observing a variety of shark species around Bimini. They are also given classroom lectures, including those taught by Dr. Samuel Gruber and Dr. Tristan Guttridge. Shark related videos and documentaries are often given in the evenings. Field trips include shark dives, stingray feedings, longlining, vertical deep water longlining, gillnetting, mangrove snorkel, nurse shark feedings and bull or hammerhead shark viewing.

When

End of April every year

Contact

Dr. Steve Turnbull - turnbull@unbsj.ca

Field Studies in Shark Biology (BIO 473) | Coastal Carolina University, Conway, SC.3 Credits

Marine science professor Dr. Dan Abel travels with a group of students every May to the Shark Lab as the grand finale to his Shark Biology Course. A host of shark experts, including Dr. Samuel H. Gruber, Dr. Dean Grubbs, Dr. Tristan Guttridge and Dr. Dan Abel serve as the courses professors for this 7-day course. Students learn about almost every aspect of shark biology, and witness several species of shark in their natural setting. Students also participate in field techniques used in the sharklab's ongoing research. Sharks most often seen include tiger, lemon, Caribbean reef, blacknose, blacktip, nurse and sometime bull sharks. A variety of rays are also observed including eagle rays and Southern stingrays. Field trips include shark dives, stingray feedings, longlining, vertical deep water longlining, shark fishing, tracking and nurse shark snorkel. 

When

Mid May every year

Contact

Dr. Dan Abel - dabel@coastal.edu 

Tropical Marine Biology (CFANS3500) | University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN. 2 Credits

This is a 8-9 day course, open to University of Minnesota undergraduates and takes place in August of each year. The course explores the natural history of the Caribbean. Students investigate several different marine ecosystems found on the island: mangroves, coral reefs, sandy and rocky inter-tidal zones. Two lectures are given daily by Dr. Peter Sorensen, Dr. Dean Grubbs and Dr. Samuel Gruber. Each lecture is followed by excursions designed to observe coral reefs, marine plant communities, fish and shark populations and the growing impacts of development on these ecosystems. The course ends with a short independent research project. 

When

Mid August every year

Contact

Dr. Peter Sorensen - soren003@umn.edu

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